The ground thaws after winter's first frost in Romanija, Bosnia and Herzegovina. 

The ground thaws after winter's first frost in Romanija, Bosnia and Herzegovina. 

Bosnia and Herzegovina: Past and Present
Bosnia and Herzegovina: Past and Present

Echoes of conflict still haunt Bosnia and Herzegovina. Over 20 years after the war (1992–1995), in which Europe’s worst genocide since World War II occurred, Bosnia’s citizens are still slowly rebuilding their lives and the country's infrastructure with reminders of the war still all around. The remains of massacred Bosnian muslims are excavated from newly discovered mass graves and buried daily in the Srebrenica-Potocari Memorial and Cemetery (over 500 new bodies were found in 2012 alone). Serbians still occupy Muslim towns annexed during the war. The current unemployment rate is estimated at 45 percent. And Bosnia’s children are growing up more isolated from neighboring ethnic groups than their parents were. But there are signs of progress. Bosnia’s youth is unified in their desire to demand a better life, more jobs and less government corruption - forged by a common past and dreaming of a better future.  

 A couple finds shelter under their umbrellas during a rainstorm in the Old City of Sarajevo.

A couple finds shelter under their umbrellas during a rainstorm in the Old City of Sarajevo.

 A young Bosnian woman with a Superman t-shirt rides the tram in Sarajevo. Cultural identity in Bosnia and Herzegovina varies among its youth - many young women embrace Western influence while others adhere to more conservative traditions, such as wearing the headscarf.

A young Bosnian woman with a Superman t-shirt rides the tram in Sarajevo. Cultural identity in Bosnia and Herzegovina varies among its youth - many young women embrace Western influence while others adhere to more conservative traditions, such as wearing the headscarf.

 A road sign made of sticks and wood in the countryside of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

A road sign made of sticks and wood in the countryside of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

 Former Mayor of Sarajevo, Dr. Tarik Kupusović, center, sits with his family during the muslim holiday Biram in Sarajevo. Kupusovic, who was the mayor of Sarajevo from 1994-1996, helped keep Sarajevo from crumbling during the siege. He still bears the stress he experienced during the war, which includes suffering from three heart attacks.

Former Mayor of Sarajevo, Dr. Tarik Kupusović, center, sits with his family during the muslim holiday Biram in Sarajevo. Kupusovic, who was the mayor of Sarajevo from 1994-1996, helped keep Sarajevo from crumbling during the siege. He still bears the stress he experienced during the war, which includes suffering from three heart attacks.

 Football fans light fireworks during a football match in Sarajevo. Bosnian football matches, which for many Bosnians symbolize patriotism and nationalistic pride, usually result in physical violence between fans of opposing teams.

Football fans light fireworks during a football match in Sarajevo. Bosnian football matches, which for many Bosnians symbolize patriotism and nationalistic pride, usually result in physical violence between fans of opposing teams.

 A cloud of smoke caused by firecrackers ignited by a fan in the stadium billows across the football field during a match in Sarajevo.

A cloud of smoke caused by firecrackers ignited by a fan in the stadium billows across the football field during a match in Sarajevo.

 A woman wipes the inside of a foggy window during a rainstorm in Sarajevo. 

A woman wipes the inside of a foggy window during a rainstorm in Sarajevo. 

 A young woman at a bar, Sarajevo. 

A young woman at a bar, Sarajevo. 

 A foggy night in Sarajevo. 

A foggy night in Sarajevo. 

 An audience of Croatians attend the concert of a Bosnian folk-singer in Zagreb, Croatia. 

An audience of Croatians attend the concert of a Bosnian folk-singer in Zagreb, Croatia. 

 A graffitied painting outside a government building in Zagreb, Croatia.

A graffitied painting outside a government building in Zagreb, Croatia.

 A door reads "vuci" or "pull" in Croatian at a nightclub in Zagreb.

A door reads "vuci" or "pull" in Croatian at a nightclub in Zagreb.

 A young woman smokes at a nightclub in Zagreb, Croatia.

A young woman smokes at a nightclub in Zagreb, Croatia.

 A woman and her colleagues celebrate an award they received from their place of work at a bar in Sarajevo.

A woman and her colleagues celebrate an award they received from their place of work at a bar in Sarajevo.

 School boys play basketball at the Gimnazija school in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Perviously, Gimnazija was known as the most renowned and academically prestigious educational institution in Yugoslavia. However, presently the children who attend Gimnazija - Catholic Croats and Muslim Bosnians - are separated from each other at school and by law can not attend class together. 

School boys play basketball at the Gimnazija school in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Perviously, Gimnazija was known as the most renowned and academically prestigious educational institution in Yugoslavia. However, presently the children who attend Gimnazija - Catholic Croats and Muslim Bosnians - are separated from each other at school and by law can not attend class together. 

 A man cleans his brother's grave in a cemetery in Mostar.  During the war Mostar was subject to an 18th month siege where and numerous religious buildings and cultural institutions were destroyed.

A man cleans his brother's grave in a cemetery in Mostar.  During the war Mostar was subject to an 18th month siege where and numerous religious buildings and cultural institutions were destroyed.

 Religious pilgrims tour The St. Peter and St. Paul catholic church in Mostar. The church, which was destroyed during the war, enlarged when rebuilt to outsize the town's nearby Islam mosque minarets on the other side of the Neretva River.

Religious pilgrims tour The St. Peter and St. Paul catholic church in Mostar. The church, which was destroyed during the war, enlarged when rebuilt to outsize the town's nearby Islam mosque minarets on the other side of the Neretva River.

 A woman's hair is dyed red at a salon in Mostar. 

A woman's hair is dyed red at a salon in Mostar. 

 A Turkish soap opera shown on a television in the home of Medina Mešanović in Sarajevo. 

A Turkish soap opera shown on a television in the home of Medina Mešanović in Sarajevo. 

 The window reflect of a man standing on a street undergoing construction in Mostar. Much of Mostar is still in ruins and is under construction after it experienced an 18-month siege during the war.

The window reflect of a man standing on a street undergoing construction in Mostar. Much of Mostar is still in ruins and is under construction after it experienced an 18-month siege during the war.

 Photographs of priests who have served at St. Peter and St. Paul catholic church in Mostar. 

Photographs of priests who have served at St. Peter and St. Paul catholic church in Mostar. 

 A collection of Delft Blue dishware at a woman's home in Sarajevo. 

A collection of Delft Blue dishware at a woman's home in Sarajevo. 

 Many Bosnians still live in apartment complexes and pre-war housing built in the soviet-era, Sarajevo. 

Many Bosnians still live in apartment complexes and pre-war housing built in the soviet-era, Sarajevo. 

 Fans cheer during a football match in Sarajevo.

Fans cheer during a football match in Sarajevo.

 Medina Mešanović, 26, revisits her favorite cafe in her home village of Visegrad, which she fled when she was a child with her family during the war. Visegrad was once home to a majority of Bosnian muslims, but was annexed by Serbian forces during the war and is now occupied mostly by Serbians.

Medina Mešanović, 26, revisits her favorite cafe in her home village of Visegrad, which she fled when she was a child with her family during the war. Visegrad was once home to a majority of Bosnian muslims, but was annexed by Serbian forces during the war and is now occupied mostly by Serbians.

 Two horses graze in a pasture after the first frost of winter outside Sarajevo. 

Two horses graze in a pasture after the first frost of winter outside Sarajevo. 

 A Serbian farmer plants crops on his land in the village of Visegrad.

A Serbian farmer plants crops on his land in the village of Visegrad.

 A dog barks on the street in the village of Visegrad.  

A dog barks on the street in the village of Visegrad.  

 Tattered papers show the names of victims massacred in the Srebrenica genocide, at the Srebrenica-Potočari Memorial and Cemetery. There are hundreds of lists displayed on the walls of a warehouse, where thousands of Bosniak muslims were tortured before being executed. 

Tattered papers show the names of victims massacred in the Srebrenica genocide, at the Srebrenica-Potočari Memorial and Cemetery. There are hundreds of lists displayed on the walls of a warehouse, where thousands of Bosniak muslims were tortured before being executed. 

 A Muslim couple prays over the grave of a relative at the Srebrenica-Potočari Memorial and Cemetery. Every year hundreds of bodies of newly identified victims killed during the war are found in mass graves and are buried here. 

A Muslim couple prays over the grave of a relative at the Srebrenica-Potočari Memorial and Cemetery. Every year hundreds of bodies of newly identified victims killed during the war are found in mass graves and are buried here. 

 Medina Mešanović, 26, spreads her arms like wings on the Mehmed Paša Sokolović Bridge in Visegrad. Thousands of Bosniak muslims were executed on the bridge, their bodies thrown over into the Drina River by the Bosnian Serb military. 

Medina Mešanović, 26, spreads her arms like wings on the Mehmed Paša Sokolović Bridge in Visegrad. Thousands of Bosniak muslims were executed on the bridge, their bodies thrown over into the Drina River by the Bosnian Serb military. 

 The ground thaws after winter's first frost in Romanija, Bosnia and Herzegovina. 
Bosnia and Herzegovina: Past and Present
 A couple finds shelter under their umbrellas during a rainstorm in the Old City of Sarajevo.
 A young Bosnian woman with a Superman t-shirt rides the tram in Sarajevo. Cultural identity in Bosnia and Herzegovina varies among its youth - many young women embrace Western influence while others adhere to more conservative traditions, such as wearing the headscarf.
 A road sign made of sticks and wood in the countryside of Bosnia and Herzegovina.
 Former Mayor of Sarajevo, Dr. Tarik Kupusović, center, sits with his family during the muslim holiday Biram in Sarajevo. Kupusovic, who was the mayor of Sarajevo from 1994-1996, helped keep Sarajevo from crumbling during the siege. He still bears the stress he experienced during the war, which includes suffering from three heart attacks.
 Football fans light fireworks during a football match in Sarajevo. Bosnian football matches, which for many Bosnians symbolize patriotism and nationalistic pride, usually result in physical violence between fans of opposing teams.
 A cloud of smoke caused by firecrackers ignited by a fan in the stadium billows across the football field during a match in Sarajevo.
 A woman wipes the inside of a foggy window during a rainstorm in Sarajevo. 
 A young woman at a bar, Sarajevo. 
 A foggy night in Sarajevo. 
 An audience of Croatians attend the concert of a Bosnian folk-singer in Zagreb, Croatia. 
 A graffitied painting outside a government building in Zagreb, Croatia.
 A door reads "vuci" or "pull" in Croatian at a nightclub in Zagreb.
 A young woman smokes at a nightclub in Zagreb, Croatia.
 A woman and her colleagues celebrate an award they received from their place of work at a bar in Sarajevo.
 School boys play basketball at the Gimnazija school in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Perviously, Gimnazija was known as the most renowned and academically prestigious educational institution in Yugoslavia. However, presently the children who attend Gimnazija - Catholic Croats and Muslim Bosnians - are separated from each other at school and by law can not attend class together. 
 A man cleans his brother's grave in a cemetery in Mostar.  During the war Mostar was subject to an 18th month siege where and numerous religious buildings and cultural institutions were destroyed.
 Religious pilgrims tour The St. Peter and St. Paul catholic church in Mostar. The church, which was destroyed during the war, enlarged when rebuilt to outsize the town's nearby Islam mosque minarets on the other side of the Neretva River.
 A woman's hair is dyed red at a salon in Mostar. 
 A Turkish soap opera shown on a television in the home of Medina Mešanović in Sarajevo. 
 The window reflect of a man standing on a street undergoing construction in Mostar. Much of Mostar is still in ruins and is under construction after it experienced an 18-month siege during the war.
 Photographs of priests who have served at St. Peter and St. Paul catholic church in Mostar. 
 A collection of Delft Blue dishware at a woman's home in Sarajevo. 
 Many Bosnians still live in apartment complexes and pre-war housing built in the soviet-era, Sarajevo. 
 Fans cheer during a football match in Sarajevo.
 Medina Mešanović, 26, revisits her favorite cafe in her home village of Visegrad, which she fled when she was a child with her family during the war. Visegrad was once home to a majority of Bosnian muslims, but was annexed by Serbian forces during the war and is now occupied mostly by Serbians.
 Two horses graze in a pasture after the first frost of winter outside Sarajevo. 
 A Serbian farmer plants crops on his land in the village of Visegrad.
 A dog barks on the street in the village of Visegrad.  
 Tattered papers show the names of victims massacred in the Srebrenica genocide, at the Srebrenica-Potočari Memorial and Cemetery. There are hundreds of lists displayed on the walls of a warehouse, where thousands of Bosniak muslims were tortured before being executed. 
 A Muslim couple prays over the grave of a relative at the Srebrenica-Potočari Memorial and Cemetery. Every year hundreds of bodies of newly identified victims killed during the war are found in mass graves and are buried here. 
 Medina Mešanović, 26, spreads her arms like wings on the Mehmed Paša Sokolović Bridge in Visegrad. Thousands of Bosniak muslims were executed on the bridge, their bodies thrown over into the Drina River by the Bosnian Serb military. 

The ground thaws after winter's first frost in Romanija, Bosnia and Herzegovina. 

Bosnia and Herzegovina: Past and Present

Echoes of conflict still haunt Bosnia and Herzegovina. Over 20 years after the war (1992–1995), in which Europe’s worst genocide since World War II occurred, Bosnia’s citizens are still slowly rebuilding their lives and the country's infrastructure with reminders of the war still all around. The remains of massacred Bosnian muslims are excavated from newly discovered mass graves and buried daily in the Srebrenica-Potocari Memorial and Cemetery (over 500 new bodies were found in 2012 alone). Serbians still occupy Muslim towns annexed during the war. The current unemployment rate is estimated at 45 percent. And Bosnia’s children are growing up more isolated from neighboring ethnic groups than their parents were. But there are signs of progress. Bosnia’s youth is unified in their desire to demand a better life, more jobs and less government corruption - forged by a common past and dreaming of a better future.  

A couple finds shelter under their umbrellas during a rainstorm in the Old City of Sarajevo.

A young Bosnian woman with a Superman t-shirt rides the tram in Sarajevo. Cultural identity in Bosnia and Herzegovina varies among its youth - many young women embrace Western influence while others adhere to more conservative traditions, such as wearing the headscarf.

A road sign made of sticks and wood in the countryside of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Former Mayor of Sarajevo, Dr. Tarik Kupusović, center, sits with his family during the muslim holiday Biram in Sarajevo. Kupusovic, who was the mayor of Sarajevo from 1994-1996, helped keep Sarajevo from crumbling during the siege. He still bears the stress he experienced during the war, which includes suffering from three heart attacks.

Football fans light fireworks during a football match in Sarajevo. Bosnian football matches, which for many Bosnians symbolize patriotism and nationalistic pride, usually result in physical violence between fans of opposing teams.

A cloud of smoke caused by firecrackers ignited by a fan in the stadium billows across the football field during a match in Sarajevo.

A woman wipes the inside of a foggy window during a rainstorm in Sarajevo. 

A young woman at a bar, Sarajevo. 

A foggy night in Sarajevo. 

An audience of Croatians attend the concert of a Bosnian folk-singer in Zagreb, Croatia. 

A graffitied painting outside a government building in Zagreb, Croatia.

A door reads "vuci" or "pull" in Croatian at a nightclub in Zagreb.

A young woman smokes at a nightclub in Zagreb, Croatia.

A woman and her colleagues celebrate an award they received from their place of work at a bar in Sarajevo.

School boys play basketball at the Gimnazija school in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Perviously, Gimnazija was known as the most renowned and academically prestigious educational institution in Yugoslavia. However, presently the children who attend Gimnazija - Catholic Croats and Muslim Bosnians - are separated from each other at school and by law can not attend class together. 

A man cleans his brother's grave in a cemetery in Mostar.  During the war Mostar was subject to an 18th month siege where and numerous religious buildings and cultural institutions were destroyed.

Religious pilgrims tour The St. Peter and St. Paul catholic church in Mostar. The church, which was destroyed during the war, enlarged when rebuilt to outsize the town's nearby Islam mosque minarets on the other side of the Neretva River.

A woman's hair is dyed red at a salon in Mostar. 

A Turkish soap opera shown on a television in the home of Medina Mešanović in Sarajevo. 

The window reflect of a man standing on a street undergoing construction in Mostar. Much of Mostar is still in ruins and is under construction after it experienced an 18-month siege during the war.

Photographs of priests who have served at St. Peter and St. Paul catholic church in Mostar. 

A collection of Delft Blue dishware at a woman's home in Sarajevo. 

Many Bosnians still live in apartment complexes and pre-war housing built in the soviet-era, Sarajevo. 

Fans cheer during a football match in Sarajevo.

Medina Mešanović, 26, revisits her favorite cafe in her home village of Visegrad, which she fled when she was a child with her family during the war. Visegrad was once home to a majority of Bosnian muslims, but was annexed by Serbian forces during the war and is now occupied mostly by Serbians.

Two horses graze in a pasture after the first frost of winter outside Sarajevo. 

A Serbian farmer plants crops on his land in the village of Visegrad.

A dog barks on the street in the village of Visegrad.  

Tattered papers show the names of victims massacred in the Srebrenica genocide, at the Srebrenica-Potočari Memorial and Cemetery. There are hundreds of lists displayed on the walls of a warehouse, where thousands of Bosniak muslims were tortured before being executed. 

A Muslim couple prays over the grave of a relative at the Srebrenica-Potočari Memorial and Cemetery. Every year hundreds of bodies of newly identified victims killed during the war are found in mass graves and are buried here. 

Medina Mešanović, 26, spreads her arms like wings on the Mehmed Paša Sokolović Bridge in Visegrad. Thousands of Bosniak muslims were executed on the bridge, their bodies thrown over into the Drina River by the Bosnian Serb military. 

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